House Hunting For You and Your Dog

From time to time we are fortunate to have contributors to the Darwin Dogs’ blog, as we like to look at things from a fresh pair of eyes.   Our most recent contributor is Bernie the Boxer.  Special thanks to him for this blog post, and his amazing ability to type it out without opposable thumbs.  

Boots and Bee Photography by Brittany Graham

Boots and Bee Photography by Brittany Graham

You love your dog and want him to be happy. He greets you at the door when you come home from work, tail wagging and eyes staring at you with adoration. He senses when you’re sad and even snuggles with you as you sit on the couch drowning your sorrows in a pint of ice cream. So is it any wonder that when you begin house hunting, you want to find a house he’ll love just as much as you do? But how do you go about finding the right home for your dog? Read on for tips on how to score the perfect home for you and your precious pooch.

Pet-Loving Realtors

Boots and Bee Photography - By Brittany Graham

Boots and Bee Photography – By Brittany Graham

When you want to find a home, think about hiring a realtor who’s a dog lover. Realtors who adore man’s best friend are more likely to take your dog into consideration when helping you find a home. Some realtors may even get sellers to agree to let your pet visit homes with you as you check out different houses. This way, you get your dog’s opinion on the home too!

Style of Home

Boots and Bee Photography - By Brittany Graham

Boots and Bee Photography – By Brittany Graham

Determine the style of home you want. Do you prefer a two story? This might be a wonderful type of home for dogs who are young and spry. But what if your dog is elderly? Older dogs may not be able to climb a lot of stairs because of joint pain. Tiny dogs like toy poodles may not have the ability to scamper up a flight of steps. Consider these factors before deciding on a style of home.

Your Canine Companion’s Size

Boots and Bee Photography - by Brittany Graham

Boots and Bee Photography – by Brittany Graham

Before you select a new home, consider your dog’s size. Larger breeds like golden retrievers and labradors need enough space to walk through rooms without knocking over your prized knickknacks. Trying to cram a super-sized dog into a one-bedroom home or condo might make your dog unhappy and uncomfortable.  If you own a smaller dog, tiny homes probably won’t bother him at all.  And don’t forget to consider the yard: small dogs won’t mind much if space is limited outside, but big dogs love expansive yards where they can romp and play.

Location of the Home

Brittany Graham Photography

Brittany Graham Photography

Dogs are social animals that crave love, attention and companionship. You’re their entire world. So it isn’t surprising they don’t handle it well if you’re absent from the house most of the time. Dogs who are frequently left alone for extended periods of time develop separation anxiety. This leads to chronic barking, excessive chewing and other undesirable behaviors. Save you and your dog a boatload of heartache by choosing a home that isn’t too far away from your job. When you have a long commute back and forth to work, it takes time away from your furry friend.

If you still end up purchasing a home far away from work, enroll your dog in doggy day care or pay someone to pet sit him for a few hours.

Nearby Dog-Friendly Parks

Brittany Graham Photography

Brittany Graham Photography

Do you long for a home your pet will adore? Consider buying a house near a dog park. Dog parks are amazing outdoor places where dogs run free, play and hang out with other dogs. Whether your pooch wants to meet some new furry friends or just lay out in the sun, dog parks are the perfect place to make it happen.

Getting Used to the New House

Brittany Graham Photography

Brittany Graham Photography

Dogs love being the masters of their domains. So when you take a dog out of his usual territory, he may feel confused. Prevent this by letting him visit the house before you move in. Take him on a walk through the new neighborhood so he becomes accustomed to the sights, sounds and smells of his new domain. He’ll get the chance to see some of his new dog neighbors, and he won’t feel threatened by them.

Before your dog enters the house, take a towel from your old home and rub it against the walls and furniture of your new home.  Familiar scents from the old house will make your canine feel more comfortable.  Make sure you’ve tucked away any detergents, bleach, or other household cleaners you may have used to prepare the house for move-in—your pup might chew to ease the anxiety of his new environment, so keep anything toxic completely out of his reach.

As soon as your dog enters the house, let him explore the rooms. Show him where his dog bed and toys are located. And don’t forget to have his favorite blanket ready for him to snuggle against.  Of course, make sure he knows where his water and food bowls are located as well.

Don’t just find the perfect house for the humans in your family. Canine family members need to approve of the new house too. If you take the time to choose a home that fits the needs of your furry baby, he will grow to love the new house as much as you do!

 

Brittany Graham Photography

Brittany Graham Photography

Keep calm and pilot on

Kerry Stack
Darwin Dogs
Dog Training in Cleveland Ohio

The Complete, Unabridged Set of Dog Rules

The young man knows the rules, but the old man knows the exceptions.
- Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

Boots and Bee Photography - by Brittany Graham

Boots and Bee Photography – by Brittany Graham

“Is it okay that my dog is on the couch?”

“Can we play tug with a rope toy? Or is that wrong?”

“We’re using puppy pads.  Is that bad?”

Questions like these from my clients make me crazy.  No, not because they are asking me questions, but because somehow they got it in their head that there are hard and fast rules to “dogging”.  They get a dog, and the first thing they want to know is what the rules are.  All. The. Rules.

winterBecause obviously, if something isn’t complicated and supremely structured, it doesn’t work.  The more rules, the better you’re doing, right?  After all, t’s been working for the DMV.

We must be cautious.

We must be cautious.

So obviously, rules suck.  Unless you’re a dog owner, and then you want the rules.  All the rules.  Well, you want ‘em?  You got ‘em.

Before I tell you the rules, let’s review the steps to working with a dog, in any capacity.  Whether stopping the barking, teaching them to sit, or maybe something a little more intricate.

Everything starts with these steps:

1) Control Yourself. 

Controlling yourself means you are calm (even if only on the outside).  You are using confident body language (stand up straight!).  You are not yelling, or even talking.  In other words, you are NOT Corky Romano.

Don’t be a Corky.

2) Control the Situation.

Meaning if you can’t stuff 10 pounds of dirt in a 5 pound bag, why are you trying to stuff 15?  Stop, take a look at the current situation.  For example, if someone is at the door, but your dog is there barking, jumping, and, well, being Corky Romano, do you have control of the situation?  No!  Then don’t add any stimulation (such as opening the door) until you have control. Answer your dog’s question about the door, and then move forward when you have control. Reboot if necessary.  Wash, rinse, repeat.

Okay, now that you know the playing field (controlling yourself and controlling the situation), now for the rules.

I use a mix of negative and positive.  The same way you do throughout your life.  I asked my husband it was raining outside  He said “no”.  That’s a negative  My daughter asked if she could go to a friends house. I said “yes”.  That’s a positive.  Think of it as a game of “hot or cold”. We call this Piloting your dog.

Rules of When to Use Negatives

1) When you don’t like what your dog is doing.  Yes, seriously…it’s that easy.  Ask yourself if you like the behavior your dog is giving (barking, jumping, or just laying against the fridge that you are trying to open), and if you don’t like it, give them a negative.  Remember your dog isn’t bad.  Dogs are incapable of being bad.  They are perfect… for a dog.  They just happen to suck at being human.

And guess what?  You probably don’t make a very good dog.

So let’s jettison the whole “Good/Bad” thing…and the gun.  You’re answering questions for your dog, not deciding if the questions make your dog “good” or “bad”.

2) When your dog is “yo-bitching” you.  Now there’s an interesting term:  ”yo-bitching“.  What does that mean?  It’s when a dog slaps you with their paw.  Or jumps on you.  Or pushes you out of the way.  It’s the human equivalent of saying, “Yo, Bitch, gimme a cookie.” Or “Yo, Bitch, that’s my chair”.  Vulgar?  Absolutely.  Acceptable?  Never.  You wouldn’t accept a human addressing you like that, so don’t accept that from a dog.  Dog’s are perfectly capable of using polite, “May-I-Please” body language.  Start to demand and expect it at all times.

On to the positives!

1) The come command/recall.  Positive, people.  Give your dog a good reason to come when you call.

2) When you are asking your dog to be human.  Think about what one dog will tell another dog.  Things like, “Go away”, or “Let’s play” or even “That’s mine”.  But dogs don’t teach each other English (“Sit”, for example). They don’t housebreak each other.  So if one dog can’t teach it to another dog, and you’re asking your dog to be a little bit human, you must use positives.

3) Calm.  This is the most important, most overlook opportunity for positives.  I want calm to be a like a lottery ticket:  You have to play to win (you’re probably not going to win), but unless you have a ticket, you definitely aren’t going to win.  That ticket is calm.  The more your dog has the “calm ticket” the more likely he is to win.  So if he’s calm, give him a gentle positive.  Anything from chilling out on the floor, to trying his best to be calm at the vet.  Reward the effort.  Progress, not perfection.

So there you have it.  That’s all the rules.  When to give positive and when to give negative.  Everything you ever needed to know about how to work with your dog.

But I didn’t address your questions from earlier?

“Is it okay that my dog is on the couch?”

“Can we play tug with a rope toy? Or is that wrong?”

“We’re using puppy pads.  Is that bad?”

Yes, I did!  About the couch, think about the negatives.  Do you like what your dog is doing on the couch?  No?  Then give him a negative.  Don’t care that he’s on the couch?  Well, then, neither do I, as long as he isn’t “yo bitching” you.

Playing tug with a rope toy?  Cool!  I love a good, rough game of tug.  My husband doesn’t.  I encourage it.  My husband negates it.  Remember, ask yourself if you like the behavior, and if the answer is “yes”, go for it.  If the answer is “no”, then negate it.  Just make sure that you have your limits adhered to.  My Sparta is allowed to really go at it with me when we wrestle…until she isn’t  When I feel things have escalated too much, I simply give her a negative, and she stops.

Puppy pads?  If it works for you, it works for me.

In short, nobody should be telling you how to enjoy your dog.  My dogs are allowed to beg from the table, as I frequently give them a small amount of table scraps.  But once I’m done with them, they are given a negative, and they know to stop begging and stay away from me while I eat.

My dogs, like yours, are only here for my enjoyment.  They make life easier, and so much sunnier!  Don’t let a book full of rules tell you how you should be enjoying their company.  Make sure you are indeed enjoying your dog, and not merely tolerating their behavior.  If you don’t like their behavior (say, getting up on the couch), it’s up to you to answer your dog’s question (“Can I sleep up here?”), and set your own rules of how to enjoy your dog.  The rules will differ from house to house, but the enjoyment will be constant.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m about to snuggle in bed with my dogs while I share my snack of cheese and crackers with them. I’m tired from all that rope-tug I played with Sparta.

Brittany Graham Photography

Brittany Graham Photography

Keep calm and pilot on

Kerry Stack
Darwin Dogs
Dog Training in Cleveland, Ohio