When Pugs Were Pugs

 Don’t you see the danger, John, inherent in what you’re doing here? Genetic power is the most awesome force the planet’s ever seen, but you wield it like a kid that’s found his dad’s gun. – Ian Malcolm, Jurassic Park
Photo: charlesdeluvio

Photo: charlesdeluvio

I love dog training, and I am fortunate enough to be constantly learning.  One of the greatest sources of growth for me has been my clients and readers.  You never let me down with your succinct and intelligent commentary.
Recently, a post on breeders vs. rescuing.  Karen Privitera’s response to the debate blew me away:
Forgive me; this is going to be long….I am conflicted.
Pugs have been a part of my family for three generations … they’ve been part of us for well over 85 years. For years, I knew of no other families with pugs; but we had magazines, books and pug organizations …and we had no debilitating medical problems with our dogs.

My earliest memories are of correcting people; it seemed like nobody knew what they were:
“he’s not a bulldog, he’s a pug”
“no, he didn’t run into a wall”
“that’s not very nice, he’s not ugly…I love him”

Fifty, forty years ago — I didn’t see pugs with their tongues hanging out constantly (birth defect); I wasn’t hearing or reading about nasal enlargement surgeries or the rest of it.

For the past 5 decades, none of our pugs have been purchased from a breeder; they have all been from shelters and legit rescue programs. One was adopted after being featured on Captain Penny’s Pooch Parade in the 1960s.

In 1981, a pug won Best of Show at Westminster. I recall telling my Vet that I hoped that “win” didn’t set off crazy popularity. I remember him looking at me oddly and asking “why?”.
I was shocked that he didn’t seem to be thinking —or concerned — about the long-term ramifications of a frenzy of bad breeding.
But that’s exactly what happened — and suddenly pugs were everywhere: in commercials, on greeting cards, etc.

…then “Men In Black” contributed to the irresponsible growth of the breed and so on & so on…

Ask long-time Dalmatian breeders what happened after the 101 Dalmatians movie came out.

Not a single pug of my grandparents’, my aunt or my immediate family ever required nasal surgery or had medical issues related to their respiratory system.
None of them were ever used for breeding.

Truth be told, I wish the day would come where only responsible, licensed, well-regulated breeders are permitted to sell animals.
I *wish* there weren’t so many animals dumped, abandoned, “born just for profit”; I will spend the rest of my life only having pets that come from those unfortunate situations.

I personally will not go to a reputable breeder, ever, for any future pets … not while so many other dogs are in shelters.
I wish I could.

In a different world, how I wish the breed hadn’t exploded — bringing all the physical problems now suffered by these sweet animals and perpetuated by greed & ignorance.

The breed is not inherently bad: irresponsible breeders are BAD.
Don’t buy from the Amish, EVER.
Don’t buy from people who “just wanted their dog to have one litter” and have no idea what the hell they’re doing.
Don’t purchase off of Craigslist; be responsible and do some damn research.

And while I’m on my soapbox: there’s no such thing as “teacup” or “miniature” or “micro” — they’re the result of runts being bred to runts. None of that is good.

Photo attached of my Grandpa — long before me. Sadly, these healthy pugs don’t look like what you see today.

Pic courtesy of Karen Privetera

Pic courtesy of Karen Privitera

Thank you, Karen, for stating exactly what needed to be said.

keep

Kerry Stack
Darwin Dogs
Dog Training in Cleveland, Ohio

Superstitious: Debunking Training Myths

When you believe in things that you don’t understand
Then you suffer
Superstition ain’t the way – Stevie Wonder

Darwin Dogs Alumni Duchess!

Darwin Dogs Alumni Duchess!

Phone calls with new clients can sometimes be a little challenging. A lot of times, they’ve already tried to fix whatever behavior problems they’re having themselves.  And they use Google as their main tool.  Now I’m as big a fan as the next person of Google and solving my own problems, but as a lot of my clients are quick to point out, everything one dog trainer states contradicts another dog trainer.

I personally try to think of it more as parenting rather than training.  You aren’t here to “train” your dog so much as to answer their questions and guide them onto the right path of behavior.  Once they are there, it’s pretty easy to keep them there with lots of positives, and the occasional gentle negation of unwanted behaviors.

But sometimes I hear some really off-the-wall ideas.  Downright fallacies not based on science, but rather based on…superstition..  Thoughts and ideas that crumple once faced with logic.  “Flat Earth” level nonsense.

 

So here we go.  The top 4 “facts” I hear about dogs and behavior.

1)  Don’t wrestle with your dog; it teaches them they can win.

Boots and Bee Photography - By Brittany Graham

Boots and Bee Photography – By Brittany Graham

This is my Sparta.  She’s a 120lb Rottie/Shep mix that I rescued over 10 years ago. When we wrestle together there is no doubt in our minds who will win.  She will.  Every.  Single. Time.  When we wrestle, she Nerfs it for me, and we both know it.  Wrestling with your dog is like 50 Shades of Gray: Safe words are a must.  You stop as soon as the first person says the word. That way there are no misunderstandings.  Good, safe fun for everyone.

But not playing because Sparta knows she can win?  That’s a power trip.  That’s like me never playing Super Smash Bros. with my 11yr old daughter because she might win. River/Bip kicks my ass all the time.  Except this one time.

MommaGeddon still knows how to throw down on Smash, though!

MommaGeddon still can do a throwdown on Smash!

So go ahead and wrestle with your dog. Just make sure that everyone is respecting when it’s time to stop, and when things have escalated too far.  If your dog hasn’t learned impulse control yet, or doesn’t stop when you call it quits, that’s a Piloting issue.  Get it sorted out first, and then enjoy your own little WWF.

2) Puppies only need 5 minutes of exercise a day per month of age.

puppy exercise

WTF is this?  Good luck with your Boxer who is only getting a 25 minute walk every day.

First, let’s start with the fact that at six months, little Fido is no longer a puppy; they are a viable young adult, (roughly) akin to about a 15 year old human. At 15, a 25 minute hike was a warm-up for me.  Secondly, is there a one-size-fits-all amount of exercise that a human needs?  Dogs are so much more varied in size and athletic ability than humans, you can’t really make such a generalized statement about their exercise needs.  Rather than relying on various memes posted, learn to read your dog’s own specific needs.  Is Fido climbing the walls? Maybe time for some activity (learn how to exercise your dog beyond the walk here).  Is Bella suddenly stopping and dropping on the walk? It could be that she’s overstimulated, especially if she’s still rambunctious in the house.  Again, that would be a Piloting issue that needs to be resolved.  But if Bella is calm on a walk, or seems to be able to calm herself down in the house, then you are probably giving her enough activity.

Final thought on activity for dogs.  More frequent and less duration is key with younger dogs.  Break it up into smaller “meals” of activity rather than just one big lump of a five-mile run.  Learn to read when your dog is “hungry” for activity rather than what some random meme tells you.

3) Don’t play rope toy/tug with your dog. It teaches them to be aggressive.

 

Newsflash: your dog is a predator. They were born aggressive. And guess what?  It’s okay.  Rope toy looks awful sometimes when your dog is really into it, but the Fifty Shades of Gray analogy still works:  as long as you’re both still having fun, it’s all cool. When you say “stop”, the game should be able to end.  If Fido is still going, it’s indicative of a Piloting problem, not an aggression problem.

Also, everything a dog does is geared towards being a more effective hunter, and working with the pack to effect a kill.  Paying rope/tug is just practicing how to hunt an animal together.

In the end, you do you on this one.  If you like practicing how to kill innocent rope toys with your dog, have at.  If not, there are plenty of other ways to bond with your dog.  But honestly, it’s the only upper body workout I ever get, so Sparta and I will still continue to play tug.  And she will still Nerf it for me so I can sometimes win, too. #GoodDog.

4) You shouldn’t let your dog on your bed/couch/chairs.

Client:  Is it okay if I sleep with my dog?
Me: I don’t care who you sleep with; that’s none of my business.

Don’t fall for anyone else’s rules.  Rules are stupid, and nobody pays attention to them anyway.  Just like Monopoly…I guarantee you aren’t playing by the rules ;)

 

Rules are different than when you give a dog a negative.

1) When you don’t like their current behavior; and

2) When they’re “Yo, Bitch-ing” you.  Learn what the “Yo, Bitch” is here.

That’s it.  If you don’t care about their behavior, and it isn’t a “Yo, Bitch”, it’s okay.  If you’re fine with the behavior, so am I.

 

There are a lot more fallacies and bits of misinformation out there, but these are the biggest bits of lunacy I hear on a regular basis.  And as Stevie says:

Keep me in a daydream, keep me goin’ strong
You don’t wanna save me, sad is my song 

I’m inclined to agree:  Superstition ain’t the way

What kinds of silly nonsense have you heard about dog training?

Keep calm and pilot on

Kerry Stack
Darwin Dogs
Dog Training in Cleveland, Ohio